Surgical Care at the District Hospital
Part 1 2 3 4 5 6 Primary Trauma Care Manual
Organizing the District Hospital Surgical Service
Organizational and management of the district surgical service
The District Hospital
Leadership, team skills and management
Ethics
Education
Record Keeping
Evaluation
Disaster and trauma planning
The surgical domain: creating the envioronment for surgery
Infection control and asepsis
Equipment
Operating room
Cleaning, sterilization and disinfection
Waste disposal
Operating Room
 


> SPONGE AND INSTRUMENT COUNTS
> SCRUBBING AND GOWNING
> SKIN PREPARATION
> DRAPING



DRAPING

Scrub, gown and glove before covering the patient with sterile drapes. Leave uncovered only the operative field and those areas necessary for the maintenance of anaesthesia. Secure the drapes with towel clips at each corner (Figure 2.8).

Figure 2.8
Figure 2.8

Draping exposes the area of the operative field and provides a sterile field for the operative staff to work. This is designed to maximize surgical exposure and limit potential for contamination. There are many approaches to draping, some of which depend on the kind of drapes being used. Do not place drapes until you are gowned and gloved, so as to maintain the sterility of the drapes. It is important to secure good exposure and a large sterile area. When laying out the drapes, the edges and folds (which hang below the operating table) are considered to be non-sterile.

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> SPONGE AND INSTRUMENT COUNTS
> SCRUBBING AND GOWNING
> SKIN PREPARATION
> DRAPING