Surgical Care at the District Hospital
Part 1 2 3 4 5 6 Primary Trauma Care Manual
Fundamentals of Surgical Practice
The Surgical Patient
Approach to the surgical patient
The paediatric patient
Surgical Techniques
Tissue Handling
Suture and suture technique
Prophylaxis
Basic Surgical Procedures
Wound management
Specific lacerations and wounds
Burns
Foreign bodies
Cellulitis and abscess
Excision and biopsies
Suture and Suture Technique
 


> ABSORBABLE SUTURE
> NON-ABSORBABLE SUTURE
> NEEDLES
> KNOT TYING



NON-ABSORBABLE SUTURE

Braided suture is usually made of natural products (silk, linen or cotton). It is acceptable in many situations, but is contraindicated in a wound that is, or may be, contaminated.

Synthetic monofilament suture, such as nylon polypropamide, may be left in the deeper layers, and is not contraindicated in situations of contamination. It is often used as continuous suture. The knots are less secure than those in braided suture or in polyglycolic acid suture and more throws are used for a secure knot.

Use non-absorbable suture material when possible. Sterilized polyester thread and nylon line produced for non-surgical purposes are acceptable compromises when commercial suture is unavailable.

> ABSORBABLE SUTURE
> NON-ABSORBABLE SUTURE
> NEEDLES
> KNOT TYING



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