Surgical Care at the District Hospital
Part 1 2 3 4 5 6 Primary Trauma Care Manual
Resusciation and Anaesthesia
Resuscitation and Preparation for Anaesthesia and Surgery
Management of emergencies and cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Other conditions requiring urgent attention
Intravenous access
Fluids and drugs
Drugs and resuscitation
Preoperative assessment and investigations
Anaesthetic issues in the emergency situation
Important medical conditions for the anaesthetist
Practical Anaesthesia
General anaesthesia
Anaesthesia during pregnancy and for operative  delivery
Pediatric anaesthesia
Conduction anaesthesia
Specimen anaesthetic techniques
Monitoring the anaesthetized patient
Postoperative management
Anaesthetic infrastructure and supplies
Equipment and supplies for different level hospitals
Anaesthesia and oxygen
Fires, explosions and other risks
Care and maintenance of equipment
Hypertension
 


> PREPARATION FOR GENERAL ANAESTHESIA
> INTRAVENOUS INDUCTION
> INTRAMUSCULAR INDUCTION
> INHALATIONAL INDUCTION
> MAINTENANCE OF ANESTHESIA
> FAILED INTUBATION



INTRAMUSCULAR INDUCTION
Ketamine may also be given by intramuscular injection to induce anaesthesia. With a dose of 6–8 mg/kg of body weight, induction occurs within a few minutes, followed by 10–15 minutes of surgical anaesthesia. At 8 mg/kg of body weight, ketamine produces a marked increase in salivary secretions. If you use intramuscular ketamine, give atropine (which can be mixed with the ketamine) to prevent excessive salivation.

Further doses of ketamine can be given intramuscularly or intravenously, as required. Intramuscular doses last longer and wear off more slowly. If ketamine is used as the sole anaesthetic agent, patients sometimes complain afterwards of vivid dreams and hallucinations; giving diazepam either before or at the end of anaesthesia can reduce these. They do not occur if ketamine is used only for induction and is followed by a conventional anaesthetic.

> PREPARATION FOR GENERAL ANAESTHESIA
> INTRAVENOUS INDUCTION
> INTRAMUSCULAR INDUCTION
> INHALATIONAL INDUCTION
> MAINTENANCE OF ANESTHESIA
> FAILED INTUBATION



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